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George Edmund Mutch

Male 1893 - 1946  (52 years)


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  • Name George Edmund Mutch 
    Born 05 Dec 1893  Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Article 1897 
    • After his father's death in 1897, George went to live with his Loiterton grandparents
    Milit-Beg 24 Oct 1916  Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mil-Action 11 May 1917 
    • embarked on HMAT Shropshire in Melbourne on 11 May 1917 and disembarked in Plymouth England on 19 July 1917
    Mil-Action 04 Nov 1917 
    • proceeded to France via Folkestone on 4 November 1917. While in France he was attached to the Aust. Flying Corps as a wireless operator and then later to the 3rd Div. Artillary HQ.
      He returned to England, disembarking at Weymouth, on 4 March 1919. He left for his return to Australia in May 1919 aboard the Kaiser-i-hind
    Newspaper 07 Nov 1917  the Cootamundra Herald, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 


    • From Pte. George Mutch.

      We are at present quartered in the camp of the Royal Flying Corps, but expect to be shifted any time. All the different trades are split up here and sent to different parts of England to complete their train ing, prior to being sifted up for serviee. The wireless operators stay in Farnborough for their course and will be quartered at Blen heim Barracks for instruction. These barracks are only about a quarter of a mile from our present camp, and are fine, large buildings. This dis trict is and has been for years the training grounds of the British Army, and the whole district is no thing but large brick barracks, which for years have formed the homes of the British regulars. Am sure you have heard and read of Aldershot. It has been computed that at pre sent there must be upwards of 200,000 British Tommies here, and we are the only Australians. At pre sent there are also a couple of thou sand of U.S.A. troops hereabouts, but understand they leave for France almost immediately. See plenty of flying here, though this is not a flying school, but the Royal Aircraft factory is here, and every machine built at these works is test ed before leaving. They have a new machine which they call the S.E 5 just out a little while. Birds abso lutely could not do the things that are done in this bus. It travels up to about 170 miles an hour, and flies in all sorts of styles. I admit I never saw flying in Australia. They rock here all over the place, and drop down from all heights any where at all. The stunts they do with them you would think wero ab solutely impossible. Looping the loop is simply child's play. Imagine one travelling along rolling over side to side, planes or wing, or what ever you like to call them, revolving like a cart wheel, or look up at one and see it coming down nose first, absolutely perpendicular, doing the same motion, and rocking about like a falling leaf, excepting that the wings are edge on to you instead of flat. I know its hnrd to imagine do ing these things. They climb up much faster than any bird up to an eagle. This forms the way to another stunt. They will start climbing, then elevate the plane to nearly the vertical, which, of coarse, is too much, and the engine cannot keep that up. The machine gradually loses way and stops. Then it falls all sorts of fashions, perhap a couple of thouand feet, then away they go. Some machines and some pilots, too, I can tell you.

      Have had a fair run around since coming here. Taken altogether, have had a much more pleasant time than I expected, and I have been treated very well ever since we arrived. Considering that we hear, such a noise about the short- age of food in England we cannot growl at the treatment received in that direction. Certainly nothing more is wasted than can be helped, but take the following as our average day's meals: Breakfast, 6.30, porridge, bacon or rissoles, with two slices of bread and margarine; dinner, pea soup, cold roast beef, potatoes and marrow, or French beans, and pickles, custard and prunes, or other small fruit, with half slice of bread. Sometimes puddings, otherwise known as ''sinkers," sometimes rice. 4.30, tea; Two sliccs of bread and jam, sometimes so called cakes, three times a week, cold meat or ham, with greens or tomatoes, and tea. (Note only tea once a day.) Even though at times, the cooking is very indifferent, one can hardly growl. Some do, though. They don't use white flour here. Bread, biscuits, cakes, etc., are all made with the brown stuff, and no thing is particularly tasty, though, no doubt, wholesome. Sugar is fair ly scarce and costs about 1/ lb, jam is not plentiful. Chocolates and sweets are a devil of a price. To bacco is about twice the price it is in Australia. Matches are a penny a box, and dashed hard to get at that.

      The war hasn't had near the effect on the country I expected, and everyone here is optimistic regard ing the outcome of the struggle, and the general impression is it will not last longer than six to twelve months more. One could hardly be anything else than an optimist here, seeing the masses of war material and munitions kicking about to spare and hearing from the hundreds that return from the front the reports that all is going well.
    Milit-End 19 Jul 1919 
    Occupation a telegraphist for the NSW Railways 
    Died 01 Mar 1946  South Grafton, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I1115  Mote/McInnes
    Last Modified 10 Jan 2015 

    Father Joseph Mutch,   b. Abt 1856, Birkenhead, Cheshire, England, 53.3848659,-3.0862398 Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Apr 1897, Deep Creek, Temora, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 41 years) 
    Mother Annie Elizabeth Loiterton,   b. 05 Jul 1872, West Jindalee, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 07 Mar 1948, Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years) 
    Married 09 Feb 1892  Lincoln Dale, West Jindalee, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • The witnesses were Ellen and James Loiterton
    Family ID F511  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Dorothea Ida Ronning,   b. 14 Oct 1896, Katyil, VIC, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Sep 1983, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Married 24 Jan 1917  Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Helen Mutch,   b. 15 Apr 1920, Harden, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2005, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 84 years)
     2. Elizabeth Caroline Mutch,   b. 24 Jun 1926, Dubbo, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 Dec 2006, Bilpin, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     3. Edmund Charles Mutch,   b. 27 Aug 1927, Dubbo, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jan 2004  (Age 76 years)
     4. John Mutch
     5. Judith Anne Mutch,   b. 28 Feb 1935, Grafton, NSW, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Mar 1986, Brisbane, QLD, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
    Last Modified 17 Mar 2018 
    Family ID F581  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 05 Dec 1893 - Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMilit-Beg - 24 Oct 1916 - Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 24 Jan 1917 - Cootamundra, NSW, Australia, -34.500898,148.091583 Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth